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Contents
Introduction: The scope of shape 1
Part One Principles of development
Chapter 1 Table shapes 11
 
1.1 Three strong shapes
1.2 Building tables
1.3 The wedge weakness
1.4 The high table
1.5 Beyond table shapes
 
Chapter 2 Shape basics 18
 
2.1 Introduction: functions and comparisons
2.2 Empty triangles every dog has its day
2.3 Around the table shape
2.4 Fighting: the liberty problem
2.5 How to connect
2.6 Fighting: eye shape
 
Chapter 3 Close range play 1 33
 
3.1 Tactical aspects of connections
3.2 One-point jump: an extended study
3.3 A study in direction of play
3.4 Compound shapes
3.5 Compound shapes reference collection
 
Part Two Principles of engagement
Chapter 4 Starting from hane 53
 
4.1 Play hane at the head of two stones
4.2 Play hane at the head of three stones
4.3 Nose plays and adding liberties
4.4 Don't permit the bulge
4.5 Don't butt towards the centre
4.6 Play at the centre of three stones
4.7 Eye-stealing patterns
4.8 Choosing the clamp
4.9 Diagonal jump: attacking perspectives
 
Chapter 5 Close range play 2 64
 
5.1 Approach plays and gain lines
5.2 Answering the outside attachment
5.3 Answering the attachment on top
5.4 Restrained shapes
5.5 Unsupported contact and angle plays
5.6 Ko lock
 
Chapter 6 Blocking Off 72
 
6.1 Open skirts and crawling plays
6.2 Moles and submarines
6.3 Half-blocking plays
6.4 Using the fourth line
 
Problem Set 1: Creating good shape 81
Part Three Practical fighting
Chapter 7 Eight faces of cutting 103
 
7.1 Windmills to pancakes
7.2 Cross-cuts: exceptions
7.3 Play lightly to counter influence
7.4 Staircase connections
7.5 Strike at the waist of a knight's move
7.6 Pushing into a knight's move
7.7 Peeping directly and diagonally
7.8 Any fool can connect against a peep
 
Chapter 8 Attach-extend mysteries 114
 
8.1 The common cutting points
8.2 The double approach
8.3 The high pincer attack
8.4 The high pincer as good shape
8.5 The low pincer attack
 
Chapter 9 Escapology 121
 
9.1 Escape tactics
9.2 Capping plays and radius-five shapes
9.3 About sector lines and the mid-point
 
Problem Set 2: Cutting points 129
Part Four Vital points and shape in the opening
Chapter 10 Extensions and invasion points 151
 
10.1 The two-point extension is stable
10.2 The three-point extension
10.3 On the third and fourth lines
10.4 On the second and third lines
10.5 On the fourth line
10.6 The threat of connecting out
 
Chapter 11 Cramp 160
 
11.1 Two-point extension: the placement
11.2 Two-point extension: capping attack
11.3 Other ways to attack
11.4 Another cramped group
11.5 Chinoiserie
 
Chapter 12 Outnumbered 169
 
12.1 Calculated risks
12.2 Ignoring a one-point pincer
12.3 Around enclosures
12.4 Two plays against the star point
 
Part Five Theory
Chapter 13 Theory applying to effective play 177
 
13.1 Doing the necessary, or losing the plot?
13.2 123 and use of threats
13.3 Miai and ABC
13.4 Double-purpose plays
13.5 Forcing: playing for definite effect
13.6 Probes: information-led effects
13.7 Counting and self-criticism
 
Chapter 14 Haengma 184
 
14.1 The next shapes
14.2 The large knight's move
14.3 The diagonal jump
14.4 The two-point jump
14.5 Quadrilaterals as ideal shapes
 
Chapter 15 Sabaki 192
 
15.1 A fundamental pattern
15.2 A large-scale example
 
Problem Set 3 : Advanced shape problems 205
 
Index of shapes 211
Index of terms 215
List of proverbs 216

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